more Minsk

Because of course you can never have too many photographs of Minsk. First, my Jeff Mermelstein tribute:

twirling in Minsk

And the others:

Minsk

Minsk

Minsk

Minsk

Minsk

Minsk

civic responsibilities in Minsk

musing in Minsk

Minsk after the rain:

Minsk after the rain

Minsk after the rain

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corners of Minsk

Of course I had to photograph where Marx crosses Lenin (or where K. Marksa crosses Lenina, if we’re being pedantic):

where Marx crosses Lenin, Minsk

I did the same for where Marx crosses Engels, but seem to have mislaid the photo. Anyway, here we are on an unremarkable corner some way from Lenin along Marx:

corner of a building along Marx street

Some corners are round:

corner on Nemiga, Minsk

And two more corners:

a corner of Minsk

a corner of Minsk

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Nezavisimosti avenue

Nezavisimosti (Nyezhavizhimosty, Nezalezhnasti, Independence) avenue (or prospect) (Belarusian праспект Незалежнасці; Russian проспект Независимости) runs through the centre of Minsk from the station at the southwest up through Nezavisimosti, Oktabrskaya and Victory squares.

The avenue is based on Zakharievskaya street, imposed on Minsk from a plan made at the end of the eighteenth century under Minsk’s governor Zakharia Korneev, after whom it was named. By the end of the nineteenth century it was a fashionable street as well as a major thoroughfare. In 1922 it was renamed Sovetskaya (Savetskaya). During the war it and Barysau were largely destroyed. After the war the wide and grandiose Stalin avenue was built in its place. It’s over 11 kilometres long and its width varies between about 50 and about 70 metres.

Minsk in One Day points out that “Together with adjacent streets the avenue forms the largest and most integral ensemble of what is known in modern architecture as ‘Stalin Empire style’.”

Lenin’s personality cult was of course undamaged by the deflation of Stalin’s; in 1962 the avenue became Leninsky. In the 1990s it was again renamed, to Skorina (or Skaryny) avenue (after this man). And in 2005 it was renamed yet again.

I haven’t yet read anywhere whether the name is supposed to celebrate independence as a general concept, or some particular independence. If it’s the latter, I wonder whose independence from whom is being celebrated.

Conceivably, its own independence from “global” adulation of brand names. Consider: At its widest it’s as wide as the Champs-Élysées, and it’s over five times as long. But it lacks the Parresque spectacle of busloads buying highly advertised tat. And despite its handsome night-time illumination, this building on Nezavisimosti is not a department store.

Nezamvisimosti ave

Nezamvisimosti ave

Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

entrance to subway, Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

Nezavisimosti ave, Minsk

Nyezhavisymosty Ave

Nyezhavisymosty Ave

Nyezhavisymosty Ave

Nyezhavisymosty Ave

underground station

underground station

Nyazhavisimosty Ave

Nezavisimosti ave in the rain

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along Pobediteley avenue

Time for a walk along Pobediteley avenue, which runs from the northwest past Victory park, the Hero City monument, and the hotel where I stayed, toward Nyezhavisimosty avenue, by which time it has acquired the name Lenin street.

shop display, Pobediteley Ave

detail, Moskva cinema, Pobediteley Ave

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